The Diplodocus Song

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To the tune of "My Darling Clementine"

 (Inspired by the exhibit Dinosaurs In Their Time at the Carnegie Museum of Natural History)

                                               
Diplodocus,
Diplodocus,
Diplodocus
Carnegii!
You are lost, and
gone forever!
Diplodocus
Carnegii.

Stegosaurus,
Stegosaurus
Ungulatus
Is his name.
Armored back plates
Did not save him
Which is cer-
tainly a shame!

Brontosaurus,
Brontosaurus,
Brontosaurus:
obsolete.
You can pat
Apatosaurus
Itís the name
Thatís right and meet.

There was T. Rex:
Many, heís vexed,
For we donít know
how he dined.
Now he stands there
with his tail up
For no tail-tracks
We could find.

Camírasaurus
Doesnít bore us
Though heís stuck there
In a rock.
From a quarry
Out in Utah
They extracted
His whole bulk.

The Jurassic,
In the past, it
Had the dinos,
In their prime!
Ceratopsians
Have all stopped, since
It is no long-
er their time

The Cretaceous
Wasn't spacious
Life filled all
The land and seas;
Asteroidal
Impacts void all
Of their lifetime
Guarantees

There was trouble
Down in Chixlub,
One June morning
At sunrise.
Meteorite
Came at first light
And it hastened
Their demise.

Hail, Carnegie.
Hail, Carnegie,
And their Sec-
tion of VP!
Every dino
Has new shine-o
And theyíre there
For us to see!

Diplodocus,
Diplodocus,
Diplodocus
Carnegii!
You are lost, and
gone forever!
Diplodocus
Carnegii.

Above: Diplodocus Carnegeii, affectionately known as "Dippy"

Above: Stegosaurus (extinct) and Gray Cat (smiling).

Above: Apatosaurus

Above: Battling T. Rexes

Above: Camarasaurus, in its original matrix

Above: A Ceratopsian-class dinosaur, Triceratops Prorus

(Coming soon: another Dippy image)

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Seriously: we know the time of day to within hours, the day of the year to within a week or so, and the year to within Ī1,000,000 years.  This is based on an observation that large meteorites tend to strike the Earth in the morning, and that we still have plants today that date back to the era of the meteor strike.  There are two types of plants; one blooms in early June and one blooms in late June.  In the immediate post-K-T-layer, we find fossilized plants of both species; the first one has bloomed, and the second one hasn't.  This limits the strike time to the second or third week of June. (back to song) [source: Chris Beard, Curator, Section of Vertebrate Paleontology, Carnegie Museum of Natural History, at a lecture he presented in 2005]

Photo credits: Joseph M. Newcomer

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Last modified: May 14, 2011